seanie’s travelogue

Djupavik Herring Factory Oil Vat

Djupavik Herring Factory Oil Vat

The water on the floor is a foot thick -- and frozen solid. It has entombed a variety of objects. and has become a photographer's haven as a result. The band Sigur Ros recorded a song in one of the factory's vats, and the echoing enromity of the room is enchanting.

Djupavik Herring Factory in Blizzard

Djupavik Herring Factory in Blizzard

The herring factory in Djupavik has long been abandoned as a factory, and is now part of the Hotel Djupavik. It's used as a gallery, a museum, and as a modern-day do-everything workshop by a real Viking named Asi. The factory looks out over a fjord, which can't quite be seen in this shot. And above it looms a mountain and tremendous waterfall.

Salt Girl: Murphy Tolstoy Seeps to the Surface in Glacier

Salt Girl: Murphy Tolstoy Seeps to the Surface in Glacier

As a kid Murphy played in the salt pans around the neighbors' wheat farm. The salt crystals fascinated her. She would chew on them in summer, even when her mother warned her not to. "The salt was coming out coz the bedrock is so solid just beneath the surface," says Murphy, "And the meltwater from the snow and glaciers couldn't sink deep enough to shed the salt. The salt came spiced with arsenic, too, from the rocks taken out of the mine and left in standing water. We liked the color of the water, iron red, salty."

Still Life in Glacier

Still Life in Glacier

Just nearby, a few hours away from this pristine patch of Glacier, is a mine gone bad, and executives come from all over the world to study the mining practices which now threaten the glistening waters running off these hills into rivers like the Flathead. Dams containing tons of cadmium and cyanide are about to break, and the companies that created them are long gone, bankrupt. "The water we brag about," says Murphy, "Is slowly changing color. Where I come from, the water is dusty red, tastes good, but spiked with something that stays in your blood."

Montana's Murphy Tolstoy

Montana's Murphy Tolstoy

She's a big-name model in Hollywood now, but she grew up in a swirl of vermiculite dust, breathing it in with the rest of her family. Out of dozens of family members, only Murphy and her brother and an aunt have survived, and all three have the smooth walls in their lungs which portend disaster. Murphy also has gold tailings effluent in her blood, and transfusions have not been able to remove them. "But I come up here and my heart swells to see the larch and mountains, coz that beauty too is in my blood."

Fire & Trunk

Fire & Trunk

In the year 2000, the federal government spent $1.6 billion to fight the summer fires which scorched 10,000 square miles. Thinning the forests would prevent a lot of fire destruction, but residents and tourists like thick forest views. Leaving the big and older trees would help prevent fires from spreading, but of course these are the first loggers want to remove. So the vicious cycle keeps turning: forests must be thinned, but will not be thinned properly, so the government spends to contain the damage instead of being allowed to be proactive.

Multnomah Falls in Fragile Light

Multnomah Falls in Fragile Light

The mist swells off the cascading water, and tiny falls multiply all the way down the sides of Larch Mountain, from which Multnomah Falls come. There are thousands of pictures here, in this light and water, but perhaps the most pleasing part of any visit is the sound of turbulent water, drowning out thoughts of mortgages and office politix. How can you think about the strategy for mollifying the Boss when flecks of spirit paint your face in the shadows of Multnomah?

Multnomah Falls in Black & White

Multnomah Falls in Black & White

Benson Bridge stretches from the sides of the ravine, about 120 feet high and jusy above the lower cascade of the falls. The bridge is only ten minutes away the parking lot and restaurant that serve as magnets for the tourists at the foot of the falls. Best time to shoot here is later afternoon in the winter; visitors are at a minimum, and the fragile light is perfect for such a large and flowing subject.

Multnomah Falls

Multnomah Falls

According to native legends, the princess of a village infected with deadly sickness went to the top of this mountain to pray to the Great Spirit for help. As Gods are wont to do, he advised that she throw herself off as a sacrifice. Her father, the chief of the village, found her body the next day and wept in furious rage. As his tears fall, the mountain began to leak its own waters, which we see now as Multnomah Falls.

Excalibur

Excalibur

Just down the street, they've blown up a couple of old casinos, like the Stardust, to put up billion-dollar wonders for an economy we all think will grow forever. This particular hotel, the Excalibur, keeps re-making itself. Some floors are off limits as construction updates the needs of tourists on a budget who nevertheless wish to gambol in the lap of luxury. The windows are designed to open only an inch. To prevent suicides? Or just to stop drunken revelers from littering the courtyard with trash?

seanie blue

seanie blue has been a member since 10 November 2007 and goes by seanieblue.

Currently in the imperial city.

I am what?

Where?

The who part I understand.

That's why I am.

But how did I get there?

That's what I'm figuring out.

:::: :::: ::::

I learned to put the party into my life after spending years being the life of the party. Every moment should be different if my experiment to slow time will ever become a piece of literature. And this year was the slowest year of my life, filled with singular moments, memorable situations. Time is slowing down. The evidence is my life!

You can also find seanie at www.seanieblue.com.